Gutenberg Lecture Award

The Gutenberg Lecture Award was proposed by MAINZ to outstanding international leaders in the field of polymer research or correlated materials. The award was handed to the recipient in a ceremony during which the recipient is giving a honorary lecture between 2005 and 2012. From 2013 onwards Johannes Gutenberg University will present this award to outstanding lecturers of all fields of the University through the Gutenberg Teaching Council (GTC). MAINZ is proud for the structural impact it has had and still has on its host university.

 

2012 - Prof. Wolfgang Wernsdorfer (CNRS, Institut Néel, Grenoble)

Wolfgang Wernsdorfer is "Directeur de Recherche" at the CNRS Institut Néel in Grenoble. In his function as a leader of the nanospintronics department he has organised cooperation with leading foreign partners and initiated a number of EU projects in which also partners from MAINZ have participated. Prof. Wernsdorfer received the Gutenberg Lecture Award in a ceremony on July 3, 2012 at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.


From left to right: M. Kläui, W. Wernsdorfer, G. Krausch

 

2011 - Prof. Robert J. Cava (Princeton University, USA)

Professor Cava completed his studies and his doctoral dissertation in materials science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He subsequently spent several years working as a materials researcher in industry and has been professor for chemistry and materials science at Princeton University, one of the eight Ivy League universities in the USA, since 1996. His current work combines both chemistry and physics, with the emphasis on research in new superconductive materials. Superconductors have the characteristic that they lose their electrical resistance once they have been cooled to below a critical temperature, thus allowing them to eject from their interior the influence of external magnetic fields.


Robert J. Cava

 

2010 - Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA)

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski obtained a degree in chemistry at the Technical University of Moscow in 1972 and was awarded his PhD by the Polish Academy of Sciences in 1976. He has been based at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, USA, since 1985, where he now heads the Center for Macromolecular Engineering. His consortium is responsible for over 600 publications listed in the Web of Science and there are more than 34,000 entries for these in the citation index. His body of publications currently makes him one of the three most frequently cited polymer chemists in the world. There are also nearly 80 patents that bear his name. Matyjaszewski holds honorary doctorates conferred by universities in France, Russia, Poland, Greece, and Belgium, and he is a member of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He received the Foundation of Polish Science Award, Poland's most prestigious science award, in 2004, and the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award of the US Environmental Protection Agency EPA in 2009. He had previously received the Humboldt Award for Senior U.S. Scientists in 1999, had been appointed to the Elf Chair of the French Academy of Sciences in 1998, and won the U.S. Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1989.


from left to right: G. Krausch, K. Matyjaszewski, G. Wegner (Photo: R. Ruffing, Wiesbaden)

 

2009 - Prof. Alex Zunger (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado, USA)

lex Zunger received his Ph.D. from Tel-Aviv University (Israel), where he worked with Prof. Joshua Jortner and Benyamin Englman on quantum theory of molecular solids. He did  his postdoctoral research at the Physics Dept. of  Northwestern University with A.J. Freeman. Afterwards, he then received the IBM Fellowship, which he spent at the Physics Dept. of U.C. Berkeley with M.L. Cohen.  Alex Zunger established and headed NREL’s Solid State Theory group, a position he still holds today. He mentored 65 post-doctoral fellows at the Solid State Thoeor group. Concomitantly, Dr. Zunger became a Prof. of Physics (adjoint) at the Physics Dept. at Colorado University, Boulder where he stayed until 1986. In 1984 he was appointed as Principal Scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and became an Institute Research Fellow in 1991. Dr. Zunger is the author 500 peer-reviewed journal articles, including over 120 publications in Physical Review Letters and Rapid Communications, and three citation classics. According to recent research done by the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI), he is the 39th most cited physicist out of more than 500,000 physicists examined, based on publications in 1981-1997 in all branches of physics.


Prof. Alex Zunger (Photo: National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

 

2008 - Prof. Michele Parrinello (ETH Zurich / Lugano, Switzerland)

Michele Parrinello became a professor for computational science at ETH Zurich in July 2001, additionally he used to be director of the Centro Svizzeri di Calcolo Scientifico (CSCS) in Manno, Tessin until 2003. Prof. Parrinello was born in 1945 in Messina, Italy and finished his studies in Physics with a laurea degree of the University of Bologna in 1968. Later he was teaching at SISSA in Trieste (Italy), then he worked for the IBM research lab in Zurich (Switzerland). Afterwards he was appointed as one of the directors of Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart (Germany) before he was appointed to ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Michele Parrinello became a professor for computational science at ETH Zurich in July 2001, additionally he used to be director of the Centro Svizzeri di Calcolo Scientifico (CSCS) in Manno, Tessin until 2003. Prof. Parrinello was born in 1945 in Messina, Italy and finished his studies in Physics with a laurea degree of the University of Bologna in 1968. Later he was teaching at SISSA in Trieste (Italy), then he worked for the IBM research lab in Zurich (Switzerland). Afterwards he was appointed as one of the directors of Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart (Germany) before he was appointed to ETH Zurich (Switzerland). His research interests lie in Physics, Chemistry and Biology and include the research of complex chemical reactions, Hydrogen compounds in different systems, catalytic processes and many other troubles of materials science.


from left to right: C. Felser, G. Krausch, M. Parrinello, K. Binder

 

2007 - Prof. Murugappan Muthukumar (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA)

Murugappan Muthukumar is recognized by many in the polymer chemistry and physics community as one of the most influential theorists of the past two decades. Exploiting the tools of both analytical theory and computer simulation, he has made seminal contributions to the understanding of a wide variety of polymer systems. His complex and successful calculations are accompanied by penetrating physical insights that make results understandable to the broad polymer audience. The tremendous breadth of his work includes topics like (i) polymers trapped in media, (ii) dendrimers, (iii) block copolymeres, (iv) semicrystalline polymers and (v) polyelectrolytes.

 

2007 - Prof. Benjamin K. Chu (State University of New York, USA)

Benjamin Chu is distinguished professor at the Department of Chemistry at the State University of New York (SUNY) in Stony Brook, NY, USA. He made a name for himself with fundamental contributions to the methodology and theory of analytic procedures in polymer science. In over 500 publications and six monographs he has described instrumental developments, measuring procedures and theoretic backgrounds for the application of the X-ray wide and small angle scattering, neutron diffraction, time-resolved scattering phenomena, Raleigh, Brillouin and Raman scattering, fluorescence, Kerr effect and rheological effects in polymers. Prof. Chu was one of P.J.W. Debye's last students, where he took his doctor's degree at Cornell University. Since 1968 he has been working at the State University of New York (SUNY) in Stony Brook as professor in the Department of Chemistry.


from left to right: N.N., B. Chu, C. Felser, M. Muthukumar, J. Michaelis, M. Schmist

 

2006 - Prof. Eugene A. Demler (Department of Physics, Havard University, Massachusetts, USA)

The recipient of this years Johannes Gutenberg Lecture Award, Professor Eugene Demler, is on of the youngest tenured professors at the Physics Department of the Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachussets. He became assistant professor at Harvard in 2001 only three years after his PhD with S.C. Zhang at Stanford on high-Tc superconductors. It took only three more years for his promotion to the rank of a full professor. Professor Demlers main research field is the theory of strongly correlated quantum systems, which includes -- among many other things -- high-Tc superconductors, quantum anti-ferromagnets, quantum-Hall systems, and, more recently, strongly interacting ultra-cold atomic quantum gases. He received first international recognition already through his PhD research. The publications together with S.C. Zhang on the theory of resonant neutron scattering of high-Tc superconductors and about microscopic mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity are among the highly cited work in the field. Important contributions together with S. Das Sarma on quantum-Hall systems and with S. Sachdev on spin-ordering quantum transitions in superconductors followed. More recently Professor Demler extended his research with great success to the theory of strongly interacting, ultra-cold quantum gases. His studies of quantum correlations of atoms in optical lattices, in particular the theory of high-temperature superfluidity of fermionic atoms in optical lattices and the several proposals for the controlled coherent manipulation of spin-exchange interactions as well as for the detection of many-body effects through noise-correlation measurements lead to a high international recognition.


from left to right: I. Bloch, C. Felser, E.A. Demler, J. Michaelis

 

2006 - Prof. Albert Fert (University Paris South, France)

Albert Fert is currently a professor at the University of Paris (South), scientific director of the Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique (cooperation with the Thales Group)  and adjunct professor at Michigan State University. He was born in 1938 and studied Physics at École Normale Supérieure in Paris and graduated in 1962. In 1963 he received his Master degree from the University of Paris and received his PhD in 1970 at the University of Paris South. Together with Prof. Peter Grünberg Prof. Fert discovered giant magnetoresistance (GMR) which is a breakthrough in gigabyte hard disks and a milestone in solid state Physics as well as in information technology. The discovery of GMR opened a new avenue of research with a high potential for applications, called spintronics.


from left to right: N.N., A. Fert, N.N., B. Hillebrands

 

2005 - Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn (Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg and Collège de France, Paris)

Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn, recipient of the first Johannes Gutenberg Lecture Award in May 2005, has strong ties to several research groups at the University of Mainz and the Max Planck Institute of Polymer Research. At the age of 48 he received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987 for his research in the new field of supramolecular chemistry, a new field beyond established routes. The field has provided the basis to generate complex structures with specific functions by exploiting non-covalent interaction between molecules through self-organisation. It mimics important processes in biology such as molecular recognition and transfers them to synthetic chemistry.


from left to right: C. Felser, H.W. Spiess, J.-M. Lehn, J. Michaelis